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Andrew Hammerand
Untitled from The Man Who Never Returned, 2014
thefader:

J DILLA’S EQUIPMENT IS HEADING TO THE SMITHSONIAN
paper-journal:

We visit Ditto Press in the next of our Studio Visit series on Paper Journal

Very awesome

on repeat all afternoon 

likeafieldmouse:

Tammy Mercure

Ernest Protasiewicz
Yoke
la-beaute—de-pandore:

Philip-Lorca diCorcia
andrewquerner:

Liberia, 2014

notnathanshotdogs:

from the brooklyn hip hop festival the other day.

roundtheplace:

In 2 weeks I’m having an exhibition at Edmund Pearce Gallery, showing some experimental work that I’ve been developing, on and off, for the past 10 months or so. It’s a big departure from my normal work. Called ‘Inversion’ it opens Tuesday 22nd July 6-8pm and is part of the Nite Art week in Melbourne. Attached is the first image. I’ll post the statement and more images in the next few days.
the-editorial:

Corey Olsen 
http://the-editorialmagazine.com/?p=3598
paper-journal:

Submit your work to Paper Journal! Details can be found on our site
Photo by Natalia Jordanova

forvivian:

Lauren Greenfield

LaurenGreenfield.com

Born in Boston, MA, in 1966.
Currently resides in Venice, CA.

Adding citations to her wikipedia page.

From her Rookie interview:
I’m engaged in this question about what has currency, what has status, and what has value. I think girls learn at an early age that their power as a woman comes from their body, and that it has value and currency. In Jackie’s story, for example, the fact that she’s an engineer that decided she could—and did—get further in life by becoming a beauty queen and a model is a really interesting and important reflection of the culture.

From her PBS Artbeat interview:
I was very lucky in their willingness to share their life with me, even after things started to change. I think that was due to our relationship and to the fact that we had been filming for awhile when that happened. But ultimately I think it makes them much more empathetic figures. Their relationship with the audience also changes. I think in the beginning you think you could never identify with these people who are living these outsized lives, and by the end you can empathize with them.

I highly, highly recommend Queen of Versailles!